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3 Speakers Who Bring Something Different To Meetings

Different and unique keynote speakers

Are you looking for something different at this year’s meeting? Do you have a hard spot to fill that needs to be both entertaining and packed with practical takeaways?

Here is a list of three keynote speakers who have presentations that are unlike anything your team has ever seen or heard before:

Chris Voss, Former FBI Lead International Kidnapping Negotiator  
Trained by the FBI, Scotland Yard, and Harvard, Chris Voss worked more than 150 kidnappings worldwide during his 24-year career with the FBI. He shares heart-pounding stories—detailing what it was like to talk high-profile criminals, including international terrorists, down—and pulls out the lessons audiences can learn about effective communication. | VIDEO

Lior Zoref, Researcher, Advisor, TED Speaker, & Author
Lior Zoref has captivated crowds at TED, Google, and more, bringing the concept of “crowd-sharing” and “crowd wisdom” to life with hilarious and high-energy on-stage demonstrations. He illustrates why the best problem-solving is done collaboratively, and how to use your network (real and online) to more easily find answers to everyday conundrums. | VIDEO

Johnny ‘Cupcakes’ Earle, Founder & CEO of Johnny Cupcakes
Johnny Earle has been named America’s “#1 Young Entrepreneur” by BusinessWeek for his zany and wildly successful ideas on creating brand loyalty and delivering a memorable customer experience. His brand “Johnny Cupcakes” has grown a cult-like following and, on stage, Johnny shares business lessons learned that challenge audiences to think about their organization in a new way while making them laugh and keeping them entertained. | VIDEO

To find out more information about our these unique speakers, or to check availability and fees for an upcoming event or meeting, call us at 1-800-SPEAKER or live chat with a member of our team right now.

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