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The Circuit: Betting, Home Runs, Good Advice

by Kate Burns
Baseball-ball-glove-bat

THe Circuit 

Leading authorities' roundup of thought leadership, trends, and personalities on the speaking circuit

As I put together The Circuit this week, I wondered, “Would our readers prefer to skim harder news, or more light, feel-good content?” (If you have an opinion, I’d love to hear from you.) I decided to default to things I don’t think are necessarily in your immediate news feeds but are worth a read. I could have included some meaty, right-now pieces like this post from the Aspen Security Forum featuring former CIA/NSA director, Michael Hayden, and former deputy assistant secretary of defense for Russia, Evelyn Farkas. Since I really want this newsletter to have something in it you find fascinating or worth repeating to a friend or colleague, I’d love your input.

HR-Derby-McNulty

A Home Run All Around

With more than 221 homers on Monday night, the MLB’s Home Run Derby made history by showcasing the most ever home runs at the event. Our friend and motivational speaker William McNulty, co-founder of Team Rubicon, has to be pretty pleased with the results too. T-Mobile pledged $5k for every home run to the veteran’s group, which manages disaster relief efforts around the world. By the end of the night, Team Rubicon benefited to the tune of more than $1.1 million. Hats off to that match up. 

Saunders-TED-12

Notice the Magic

Since most of us will never come close to trekking the Antarctic ourselves, explorer and adventurer Ben Saunders brings the cold, snowy landscape to us. In a recent sit down with TED, he shared 12 lessons he learned from living in and battling with the harshest environment on earth. Like #9, “Stop and notice the magic.” As Ben explains, “Because I’d done it for many months, I lost sight of the sheer miracle of being down there on my own, the magic of it, and the joy of doing what I dreamt of doing when I was a kid.” He also talked about conserving his energy, both physically and mentally—compartmentalizing his worries – and staying calm in the face of fear.

Duke-Annie-Google

Thinking in bets

In a Talk at Google, World Series of Poker champion Annie Duke outlined parallels in decision making between the poker table and everyday life. “In poker you don’t get to see all the cards. You have to make a decision based on a limited set of information. That’s just like life.” She also encourages people to bubble up the uncertainty in their lives. Why? Perhaps counterintuitively, she says it opens up more opportunities, question why you might be wrong, and consider new opinions. Finally, she talks about one of the biggest mistakes in poker: playing too many hands. Pointing out that “just doing a bunch of stuff” doesn’t payoff, Duke digs into the value of being selective and not punting your decision making. “Not making a decision is the same as making a decision,” she explains.

Fussell-Business-Insider

Advice from a seal

Co-author of leadership philosophy Team of Teams, Navy SEAL Chris Fussell recently shared some of the best advice he received early in his military career. He encourages others to seek out three kinds of people to use as a benchmark for their personal performance, including a peer, a subordinate, and someone senior. By comparing notes on your performance to those people, he argues, you are going to exponentially raise your game.

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