David Wasserman: Border Districts For 2018 Elections

David Wasserman: Border Districts For 2018 Elections

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In this video, US House Editor for the Cook Political Report, David Wasserman, comments on the importance of border districts for Republican or Democratic majorities. He shares how he believes Republicans did a decent job of getting their vote out compared to some of the other races we have watched.

An enthusiast for data and maps, Wasserman served as a contributing writer to the 2014 and 2016 editions of the Almanac of American Politics. A frequent speaker and guest lecturer, he has shared insights into the latest political trends with audiences at Harvard's Institute of Politics, the Dole Institute of Politics, and the University of Chicago Institute of Politics – where he taught a seminar on redistricting and electoral geography and was named a Pritzker Fellow in 2019. Wasserman was also awarded “Best of Twitter” honors by Twitter in 2014 for his real-time election coverage.

Prior to joining the The Cook Political Report in 2007, Wasserman served for three years as House editor of Sabato’s Crystal Ball, a widely respected political analysis newsletter and website founded by renowned University of Virginia professor Larry Sabato. In that role, Wasserman led the publication to correctly predict Democrats would score a gain of 29 House seats in November 2006. 

House Editor of The Cook Political Report

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David Wasserman is the US House editor and senior election analyst for the independent, non-partisan publication, the Cook Political Report. A prominent election analyst respected and trusted by Republicans and Democrats as accurate and impartial, David's expert commentary regularly appears on TV outlets and in major publications. Called “whip smart” and “scrupulously nonpartisan” by The Los Angeles Times, he analyzes the current political environment, looking at both national and local politics, what the future holds for both political parties, the three critical trends that affect voting, and the 12 clusters of voters that affect voting. Incorporating up-to-date examples from the past week of news and fascinating political facts, Wasserman’s presentations are lively, entertaining, and interesting, and he uses relevant analogies that are as smart as they are memorable.