Jonah Berger: Making It Easier for Change to Occur

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Jonah Berger is an Associate Professor of Marketing at University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business and best-selling author of multiple books including Contagious: Why Things Catch On and Invisible Influence: The Hidden Forces that Shape Behavior. Berger’s new marketing speech about making it easier for change to occur touches on aspects of his most recent book published in March of 2020, The Catalyst: How to Change Anyone’s Mind.

Growing personally as a business or organization always requires a level of change but as we all know change can be hard! Berger’s unique research informs listeners about the various roadblocks to change. He answers questions about consumer behavior such as “What keeps people buying the same products year after year instead of trying something new?” This innovative speech teaches listeners how to change minds and incite action not by pushing harder, but by figuring out what are the barriers. 

Berger also delves into the status quo bias which says we have an emotional bias to stick with what we already do and know. Using excellent examples and scenarios, Berger explains why uncertainty and comfort act as roadblocks on the path to change.

Instead of hitting the pause button, watch this video and learn how to be a catalyst, reduce roadblocks, and remove barriers to make it easier for change to occur.

Marketing Professor and Best-Selling Author of Contagious

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Have you ever wondered why more salespeople buy BMWs than other cars? Or why a name’s popularity grows after a hurricane of that name hits? Jonah Berger has the answers. A marketing professor at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and the New York Times best-selling author of the books "Contagious: Why Things Catch On" and "Invisible Influence: The Hidden Forces That Shape Behavior," Berger has spent the last decade studying how social influence works, why certain ideas and products catch on, and what we can do to make ourselves more influential. He shares with audiences the keys to harnessing this “influence” to forge great partnerships, sell slow-moving products, and be more intentional with business strategies. His work is regularly published in top-tier journals, he consults for a variety of Fortune 500 companies, and popular outlets like Harvard Business Review often cover his work.