Shon Hopwood: From Bank Robber To Law Professor

Shon Hopwood: From Bank Robber To Law Professor

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Dave Rubin of The Rubin Report talks to criminal justice reform advocate, Shon Hopwood, to discuss his 11 years in federal prison for committing a bank robbery, his journey to becoming a law professor at Georgetown University, his views on mandatory minimums, and more. 

Shon Hopwood is an Associate Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he is an expert on federal courts, criminal procedure (including federal sentencing), and prisoners’ rights. Shon’s unusual legal journey began not at law school, but federal prison, where he learned to write briefs for other prisoners. Hopwood was serving a 11-year sentence stemming from bank robberies in Nebraska. Two petitions for certiorari that he prepared were later granted review by the United States Supreme Court, a very unusual feat. Upon seeing Hopwood’s work, former US Solicitor General Seth Waxman remarked that a petition, which in turn reduced the fellow prisoner’s sentence by four years, was one of the best he had ever seen. Hopwood continued his work and went on to win cases for other prisoners in federal courts across the country, helping inmates from Indiana, Michigan, and Nebraska receive sentence reductions from lower courts.

Associate Law Professor at Georgetown University Law Center, Criminal Justice Reform Advocate, and Motivational Speaker

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Shon Hopwood is an Associate Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he is an expert on federal courts, criminal procedure (including federal sentencing), and prisoners’ rights. Shon’s unusual legal journey began not at law school, but federal prison, where he learned to write briefs for other prisoners. Shon’s incredible story of second chances and success after failure has been featured in the The New York Times, The Washington Post, The New Yorker, NPR, and most recently, on 60 Minutes. He is the author of the memoir Law Man: My Story of Robbing Banks, Winning Supreme Cases and Finding Redemption, and an advocate for criminal justice reform.